What happened to international solidarity?

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Some of the responses of the moronic Trotskyite left to events in Iran are, unsurprisingly, less than impressive.

At the Socialist Unity blog, John Wight has written a post in which he has no words of criticism for the Iranian regime which is currently murdering its citizens in the streets. Instead he is angry at the Western imperialists:

“As for Britain meddling, isn’t this a case of twas ever thus? When will the arrogance of our government ever end when it comes to pointing the finger at and meddling in the internal affairs of nations of the developing world?…The British media, it has to be said, have once again been a disgrace with the bias of their coverage.”

This weird far-leftist worship of traditional notions of state sovereignty truly exposes their moral bankruptcy and tactical ineptitude. My criticism of the British government would be that they are not condemning the Iranian theocrats and their heavily-armed fundamentalist bootboys loudly enough. As for attacking our media perhaps Wight is more a fan of Press TV, an Iranian-sponsored broadcaster firmly positioned up Ahmadinejad’s backside.

Yoshie over at the appropriately-named Lenin’s Tomb blog (dead geezer, dead ideology) at least admits some unpleasant things have happened in revolutionary Iran (like the butchering of Iranian leftists) but yet still insists:

“The Iranian Revolution has done more good than bad for a majority of Iranians, making Iran the best country — the most democratic! — in the Middle East today.”

The most “democratic”? I think Yoshie is forgetting about that nearby country populated mostly by people of Jewish extraction which has had a system of competitive elections for six decades now. “Best” is obviously entirely subjective. I’m assuming Yoshie appreciates a country with strong leadership, i.e. unelected old clerics and Holocaust-deniers. Looking at his other post titles – ‘Ahmadinejad won’ and ‘Why the Islamic Republic has survived’ – I think we can guess which side Yoshie is rooting for.

And Harry’s Place reports that the SWP-controlled ‘Stop the War Coalition’ has released a statement in which the priorities for all those concerned with international peace and justice are made clear:

“The crisis unfolding in Iran must not become the pretext for renewed intervention by the USA or Britain in the region, nor for a whipping up of further tension around Iran’s nuclear programme.

The responsibility of the anti-war movement is first of all to oppose the role of the British government in the region, and to prevent its posturing being used as a pretence to justify a US or Israeli military attack against Iran…

The Stop the War Coalition believes that resolving the crisis is the right and responsibility of the Iranian people alone, and that external interference can play no positive role…It would be wrong for us to take any position on the disputed outcome of the Iranian presidential election…”

These sad excuses for ‘socialists’ have a single agenda: opposition to Western states. They are so obsessed and dogmatic in their outlook that they are obviously very confused about what is happening in Iran. They interpret Iran primarily as an “anti-Imperialist” force and therefore do not care what happens to Iranian gays, trade unionists, women, etc, as long as the Iranian government remains an enemy of the US and Israel. The sneery dismissals of the Iranian protesters as the ‘privileged middle-classes’ and suchlike reveal their true colours.

Can you imagine these wacky arguments being used by leftists in the past in opposition to foreign intervention in Republican Spain, or in South Africa under apartheid? These fools are making a mockery of one of the left’s finest traditions: international solidarity. They are a disgrace. 

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7 Responses to “What happened to international solidarity?”

  1. ejh Says:

    that nearby country populated mostly by people of Jewish extraction which has had a system of competitive elections for six decades now.

    Yes, but seeing as a very large proportion of the potential eletorate were actually driven from that country at the start of that process, it’s not really a terribly good example, is it?

  2. voteredgogreen Says:

    Jako –

    Smack. Down. Couldn’t agree more.

  3. captainjako Says:

    EJH – I’m not an adoring fan of everything that has happened/is happening in Israel, but in a troubled region with few functioning democracies the Israeli political system is head and shoulders above the rest. I’d feel much safer protesting against the government in the streets of Jerusalem than in Tehran.

  4. modernityblog Says:

    good one Jako

  5. ejh Says:

    the Israeli political system is head and shoulders above the rest.

    That does rather avoid the point I made, does it not, that before you talk about democracy in Israel it’s useful to observe that a huge proportion of the population were driven out of the country to enable this to happen? I mean this isn’t a minor thing, is it? I mean it’s not so much “where is my vote?” as “where are the voters”?

    Should you really have written the sentence “populated mostly by people of Jewish extraction” without reflecting on the process by which that came to pass?

    I’d feel much safer protesting against the government in the streets of Jerusalem than in Tehran.

    Would you? I’m not sure I would. It might of course depend on who I was and what I was protesting about. Israel is not exactly careful about civilian life when it’s Palestinian or Lebanese people in the way.

  6. captainjako Says:

    “That does rather avoid the point I made, does it not, that before you talk about democracy in Israel it’s useful to observe that a huge proportion of the population were driven out of the country to enable this to happen?”

    Without wanting to neglect the importance and continuing significance of the events surrounding the establishment of Israel, I do not accept that every time the Israeli democratic system is mentioned it is necessary to include a reference to the Nakba.

    “Should you really have written the sentence “populated mostly by people of Jewish extraction” without reflecting on the process by which that came to pass?”

    I love history but I don’t see why it’s a requirement to put every single statement about a contemporary phenomena in detailed historical context. Perhaps I should also reflect on the role of Zionist terrorists in persuading the British government to allow the creation of a Jewish state. Maybe I should additionally reflect on the Holocaust and the incentive that gave to Zionists. When does it stop?

    “Would you? I’m not sure I would. It might of course depend on who I was and what I was protesting about. Israel is not exactly careful about civilian life when it’s Palestinian or Lebanese people in the way.”

    Suit yourself. I’m not going to get into the whole ‘I support Israel/Palestine’ argument. I think it’s worth pointing out, however, that even though Israel’s elections committee wanted to ban an Israeli-Arab party in the recent election because it supposedly refused to recognise Israel and supported terrorism, the Supreme Court of Israel overturned this ruling and allowed them to stand.

    I can’t imagine such tolerance of opposing points of view coming from the Guardian Council in Iran. Which brings us back to the original point of ‘which state in the Middle East is the most democratic’. To which the answer remains Israel.

  7. modernityblog Says:

    Talking of history.

    What do modern day political “anti-Zionists” think of the 1939 MacDonald White Paper, which seriously limited Jews from entering Palestine?

    Are these political “anti-Zionists” in agreement with its intent or not?

    Well?

    Will any of them be bold enough to reply in a reasoned way?

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